A CORNER OF THE UNIVERSE

May
veganection:

On animal cruelty in Egypt
It’s early morning in Cairo and the streets are as empty as they ever are. A few cars move on the narrow streets in downtown Cairo near the Parliament building. There are a few screams that continue to grow louder as the main thoroughfare approaches. They are not human, that much is clear.
I quickly move toward the sounds, expecting to find a few street cats battling over territory, but instead am shocked at what unfolds in front of me. There are two teenagers laughing. One holds what appears to be a 6-month-old kitten in his arms. Then, shockingly, he drops the kitten towards the ground, grabbing his leg as he tumbles toward the cement. In one swooping motion, the kitten is then tossed high into the air towards the friend, who luckily catches the young animal. The kitten’s screams of horror are unmistakable.
Thankfully, a few yells at the youngsters force them to put the little kitten onto ground and allows the little guy to scramble underneath a nearby car, where it appears his mother is waiting.
The incident is not abnormal for Egypt and how it treats its animal population. One Egyptian woman told me how she was walking downtown one evening and saw a middle-aged man kick a kitten into a wall, undoubtedly ending the young cat’s life.
“It was shocking and horrifying,” she told Bikyamasr.com shortly after the incident.
But it is not only how Egyptians deal with street cats that is shocking. Working animals are dealt with as if they feel no pain. The Brooke Institute – a leading international organization that works with local workers to better the treatment of working animals – told Bikyamasr.com how many Egyptians who employ donkeys or horses for labor do very little in terms of assisting them when they get old, are wounded, or fall ill.
Thankfully, they have deployed mobile veterinarian units to help animals receive adequate assistance for wounds inflicted in the line of duty. This has done wonders to give donkeys a new lease on lives and has increased awareness among rural Egyptians to take care of their animals.
But that is only part of the problem facing domestic workers. When turmoil or violence occurs in the country, as it did during the January 2011 uprising, farmers simply fled their farms, leaving horses, cows, goats and donkeys to starve to death. Their bodies, what was left, were immortalized by images that shocked much of the world, but did little to change any perception of animals in the country.
This is all the tip of the iceberg. Animal testing and factory farming has begun to grow exponentially in the country. The two largest killers of animals across the globe.
Egyptians want their meat, eating over 12 kilos per person annually, according to statistics. This figure increases dramatically as one climbs the class ladder. The wealthy want their meat products, and they don’t want to pay for it. In came the factory farm.
In the Nile Delta, enclosed facilities have begun to make their presence, where thousands upon thousands of chickens are debeaked, forced into coups where they have no mobility at all. And their is no regulation. The stench, the waste and the large scale killing that has come to revelation in the Western world is only beginning in Egypt and the consumer and the producer are more than willing to employ this cheap method of murder without fear for a backlash from activists or the government.
One of the untouched topics of debate on animal related issues is that of animal testing. At Cairo University earlier this fall, activists revealed widespread testing on an assortment of animals. Pharmaceuticals have facilities across Egypt where mice, rabbits, cats and other animals are doused daily in the latest medicine, cosmetics and other products to “gauge” their reactions.
The response: outrage by a few, silence my the majority. Egyptians simply don’t care. Just as the two boys on the street laughed at my anger over the cruelty against the little kitten, Egyptians believe animals are the “dominion” of humans, making any attempt to change the mindset difficult at best.
In order to begin to foment change within Egyptians hearts and minds towards its animal population, Egyptian animal rights activists must begin to employ new methods, show videos and speak out. Forcing the government and the ministry of agriculture to establish regulations for animal production would be a place to start. Where other countries have rules and legal ramifications for animal rearing, Egypt has none, and what animal-related legislation is out there – namely the illegal trade in endangered species – is forgotten or simply disregarded.
Egypt faces a tenuous future, its human rights record is in disarray, and while many rights activists argue animals should come second to human needs, they forget how historically, as the plight of animals grows positively, so does the human rights record.
Previously posted on BikyaNews.com
Source

veganection:

On animal cruelty in Egypt

It’s early morning in Cairo and the streets are as empty as they ever are. A few cars move on the narrow streets in downtown Cairo near the Parliament building. There are a few screams that continue to grow louder as the main thoroughfare approaches. They are not human, that much is clear.

I quickly move toward the sounds, expecting to find a few street cats battling over territory, but instead am shocked at what unfolds in front of me. There are two teenagers laughing. One holds what appears to be a 6-month-old kitten in his arms. Then, shockingly, he drops the kitten towards the ground, grabbing his leg as he tumbles toward the cement. In one swooping motion, the kitten is then tossed high into the air towards the friend, who luckily catches the young animal. The kitten’s screams of horror are unmistakable.

Thankfully, a few yells at the youngsters force them to put the little kitten onto ground and allows the little guy to scramble underneath a nearby car, where it appears his mother is waiting.

The incident is not abnormal for Egypt and how it treats its animal population. One Egyptian woman told me how she was walking downtown one evening and saw a middle-aged man kick a kitten into a wall, undoubtedly ending the young cat’s life.

“It was shocking and horrifying,” she told Bikyamasr.com shortly after the incident.

But it is not only how Egyptians deal with street cats that is shocking. Working animals are dealt with as if they feel no pain. The Brooke Institute – a leading international organization that works with local workers to better the treatment of working animals – told Bikyamasr.com how many Egyptians who employ donkeys or horses for labor do very little in terms of assisting them when they get old, are wounded, or fall ill.

Thankfully, they have deployed mobile veterinarian units to help animals receive adequate assistance for wounds inflicted in the line of duty. This has done wonders to give donkeys a new lease on lives and has increased awareness among rural Egyptians to take care of their animals.

But that is only part of the problem facing domestic workers. When turmoil or violence occurs in the country, as it did during the January 2011 uprising, farmers simply fled their farms, leaving horses, cows, goats and donkeys to starve to death. Their bodies, what was left, were immortalized by images that shocked much of the world, but did little to change any perception of animals in the country.

This is all the tip of the iceberg. Animal testing and factory farming has begun to grow exponentially in the country. The two largest killers of animals across the globe.

Egyptians want their meat, eating over 12 kilos per person annually, according to statistics. This figure increases dramatically as one climbs the class ladder. The wealthy want their meat products, and they don’t want to pay for it. In came the factory farm.

In the Nile Delta, enclosed facilities have begun to make their presence, where thousands upon thousands of chickens are debeaked, forced into coups where they have no mobility at all. And their is no regulation. The stench, the waste and the large scale killing that has come to revelation in the Western world is only beginning in Egypt and the consumer and the producer are more than willing to employ this cheap method of murder without fear for a backlash from activists or the government.

One of the untouched topics of debate on animal related issues is that of animal testing. At Cairo University earlier this fall, activists revealed widespread testing on an assortment of animals. Pharmaceuticals have facilities across Egypt where mice, rabbits, cats and other animals are doused daily in the latest medicine, cosmetics and other products to “gauge” their reactions.

The response: outrage by a few, silence my the majority. Egyptians simply don’t care. Just as the two boys on the street laughed at my anger over the cruelty against the little kitten, Egyptians believe animals are the “dominion” of humans, making any attempt to change the mindset difficult at best.

In order to begin to foment change within Egyptians hearts and minds towards its animal population, Egyptian animal rights activists must begin to employ new methods, show videos and speak out. Forcing the government and the ministry of agriculture to establish regulations for animal production would be a place to start. Where other countries have rules and legal ramifications for animal rearing, Egypt has none, and what animal-related legislation is out there – namely the illegal trade in endangered species – is forgotten or simply disregarded.

Egypt faces a tenuous future, its human rights record is in disarray, and while many rights activists argue animals should come second to human needs, they forget how historically, as the plight of animals grows positively, so does the human rights record.

Previously posted on BikyaNews.com

Source

(via little-feminist-princess)